Total Hip Arthroplasty in Young Patients with Post-Traumatic Arthritis of the Hip. HIP International, 27(6), 546–550.

Total Hip Arthroplasty in Young Patients with Post-Traumatic Arthritis of the Hip

Swarup, I., Sutherland, R., Burket, J. C., & Figgie, M. P. (2017).
Hip

Post-traumatic arthritis of the hip is a degenerative condition that commonly affects young patients. In this study, we evaluate long-term implant survival and patient-reported outcomes after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) in patients aged 35 or younger with post-traumatic arthritis of the hip.

We conducted a retrospective study with follow-up. A chart review was performed to identify young patients with post-traumatic arthritis of the hip treated with primary THA. Follow-up surveys were conducted to determine implant survival and patient-reported outcomes. Implant survival was assessed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and patient outcomes were determined using the hip disability and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS).

We studied 42 patients (44 THAs) with a mean time to follow-up of 14 years. The 10-year implant survival rate was 87% and 20-year implant survival rate was 41%. Implant survival did not differ based on patient age, gender, implant type, bearing surface, or use of cement for implant fixation (p>0.05). The mean HOOS scores at follow-up were 87 for pain, 85 for symptoms, 89 for ADLs, and 76 for sports. HOOS scores were significantly worse in patients that had undergone revision THA (p<0.05).

Young patients with post-traumatic arthritis of the hip have good long-term outcomes after THA. However, revision THA is predictive of worse long-term outcomes.


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