The Effect Of Different Bearing Surfaces On Metal Ion Levels In Urine Following 28 Mm Metal-On-Metal And 28 Mm Metal-On-Polyethylene Total Hip Arthroplasty. Scandinavian Journal of Surgery. 2013;102(3):197-203.

The Effect Of Different Bearing Surfaces On Metal Ion Levels In Urine Following 28 Mm Metal-On-Metal And 28 Mm Metal-On-Polyethylene Total Hip Arthroplasty

Tiusanen H, Mäkelä K, Kiilunen M, Sarantsin P, Sipola E, Pesola M.
Hip

Recent advancements in manufacturing technology have enabled more precise tolerances and surface finishes using metal-on-metal bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty. The aim of this study was to compare the level of metal ions in urine after implantation of a 28-mm metal-on-metal bearing manufactured from high-carbon wrought alloy and a 28-mm metal-on-polyethylene bearing.

A total of 92 total hip arthroplasty patients were prospectively randomized into two groups: those receiving metal-on-metal bearings and those receiving metal-on-polyethylene bearings. Chromium, cobalt, and molybdenum ion levels in urine were measured preoperatively and at 1 year and 2 years postoperatively.

In the metal-on-polyethylene group, there was a slight increase in mean chromium and cobalt concentrations at 2-year follow-up compared to the preoperative level (p = 0.02 for both chromium and cobalt). In the metal-on-metal group, there was a 15-fold increase in chromium and a 26-fold increase in cobalt at 2-year follow-up compared to the preoperative level (p < 0.001 for both chromium and cobalt). However, the quantity of chromium and cobalt in urine from the metal-on-metal group was not higher at 2-year follow-up than at 1-year follow-up (p = 0.5 and p = 0.6, respectively).

The 28-mm metal-on-metal bearings yield chromium and cobalt concentrations in urine that can be higher than those recommended for occupational exposure. However, our results also indicate that a steady state in wear and ion production using metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty can occur.


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