The Journal of Arthroplasty, Volume 36, Issue 2, 566 - 572

The 22 to 25-Year Survival of Cemented and Cementless Total Knee Arthroplasty in Young Patients

Kim, Young-Hoo et al.
Knee

Background

Despite cementless total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) have potential advantages over cemented TKAs, there are conflicting results. The purpose of the present study is to determine the long-term clinical and radiographic results, the survival rate, and the prevalence of osteolysis of cemented vs cementless TKAs.

Methods

A total of 261 patients (522 knees) who underwent bilateral simultaneous TKAs were included in the present study (mean age, 62.5 ± 5.5 years). Patients were evaluated clinically, radiographically, and also using computed tomography scans. A mean follow-up period was 23.8 years (range, 22-25 years).

Results

There were no significant differences between the Knee Society total score, change in total score, knee function score, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index score in the 2 groups. In total, 8 knees (3%) were revised in the cementless group and 5 knees (2%) in the cemented group. Radiographs and computed tomography scans showed no femoral, tibial, or patellar osteolysis in either group. The rate of survival at 25 years was 97% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92%-100%) in the cementless group and 98% (95% CI, 94%-100%) in the cemented group, with reoperation for any reason as the end point. The rate of survival at 25 years was 98% (95% CI, 94%-100%), with reoperation for aseptic loosening as the end point in both groups.

Conclusions

At this length of follow-up, cementless TKA has comparable outcomes and survivorship to cemented TKA.

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