The Journal of Arthroplasty , Volume 33 , Issue 9 , 2843 - 2850

Patient-Specific Simulated Dynamics After Total Knee Arthroplasty Correlate With Patient-Reported Outcomes

Twiggs, Joshua G. et al.
Knee

Background

Component alignment variation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) does not fully explain the instance of long-term postoperative pain. Joint dynamics following TKA vary with component alignment and patient-specific musculoskeletal anatomy. Computational simulations allow joint dynamics outcomes to be studied across populations. This study aims to determine if simulated postoperative TKA joint dynamics correlate with patient-reported outcomes.

Methods

Landmarking and 3D registration of implants was performed on 96 segmented postoperative computed tomography scans of TKAs. A cadaver rig–validated platform for generating patient-specific simulation of deep knee bend kinematics was run for each patient. Resultant dynamic outcomes were correlated with a 12-month postoperative Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). A Classification and Regression Tree (CART) was used for determining nonlinear relationships.

Results

Nonlinear relationships between the KOOS pain score and rollback and dynamic coronal alignment were found to be significant. Combining a dynamic coronal angular change from extension to full flexion between 0° and 4° varus (long leg axis) and measured rollback of no more than 6 mm without rollforward formed a “kinematic safe zone” of outcomes in which the postoperative KOOS score is 10.5 points higher (P = .013).

Conclusion

The study showed statistically significant correlations between kinematic factors in a simulation of postoperative TKA and postoperative KOOS scores. The presence of a dynamic safe zone in the data suggests a potential optimal target for any given individual patient’s joint dynamics and the opportunity to preoperatively determine a patient-specific alignment target to achieve those joint dynamics.


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