Neuroma of the Infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve following Total knee Arthroplasty: a case report. BMC Musculoskelet Disord 20, 536 (2019).

Neuroma of the Infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve following Total knee Arthroplasty: a case report

Xiang, Y., Li, Z., Yu, P. et al.
Knee

Background

Injury to the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve (IBSN) is common during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with a standard midline skin incision. Occasionally, painful neuromas form at the transection of nerve and cause pain and limitation of the range of motion of the knee joint.

Case presentation

A 70-year-old woman experienced right knee pain and stiffness for 4 years after TKA. Physical assessment revealed medial tenderness; Tinel’s sign was positive. Radiographs revealed that the prosthesis was well-placed and well-fixed. She was diagnosed with arthrofibrosis and possible neuroma after TKA. She underwent right knee exploration, neurectomy, adhesiolysis and spacer exchange. The neuroma-like tissue was sent for pathological examination. The patient recovered uneventfully and at 3-month follow-up reported no recurrence of pain or stiffness. The pathological report confirmed the diagnosis of neuroma.

Conclusions

IBSN injury should be a concern if surgeons encounter a patient who has pain and stiffness after TKA. Tinel’s sign, local anesthetic injection, MRI and ultrasound could help the diagnosis and identify the precise location of neuroma. Surgical intervention should be performed if necessary.


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