Metal ion concentrations after metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty are not correlated with habitual physical activity levels. HIP International, 29(6), 638–646.

Metal ion concentrations after metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty are not correlated with habitual physical activity levels

Jelsma, J., Schotanus, M. G., Senden, R., Heyligers, I. C., & Grimm, B. (2019).
Hip

Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip arthroplasties have shown high clinical failure rates with many patients at risk for a revision and under surveillance for high metal ion concentrations. Implant wear releasing such ions is assumed to be a function of use, i.e. the patient’s physical activity. This study aimed to assess whether habitual physical activity levels of MoM patients are correlated with metal ion concentrations and are higher in patients with high (at risk) than in patients with low (safe) metal ion concentrations.

A cohort study was conducted of patients with any type of MoM hip prosthesis. Metal ion concentrations were determined using ICP-MS. Habitual physical activity of subjects was measured in daily living using an acceleration-based activity monitor. Outcome consisted of quantitative and qualitative activity parameters.

In total, 62 patients were included. Mean age at surgery was 60.8 ± 9.3 years and follow-up was 6.3 ± 1.4 years. Cobalt concentrations were highly elevated overall (112.4 ± 137.9 nmol/L) and significantly more in bilateral (184.8 ± 106.5 nmol/L) than in unilateral cases (87.8 ± 139.4 nmol/L). No correlations were found between physical activity parameters and metal ion concentrations. Subgroup analysis of patients with low versus high cobalt concentration showed no significant differences in habitual physical activity.

No correlation was found between physical activity levels and metal ion concentrations. Implant use by normal habitual activities of daily living seems not to influence metal ion concentrations.


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