Acta Orthopaedica, 84:4, 371-376, DOI: 10.3109/17453674.2013.824801

Impaction grafting of the acetabulum with ceramic bone graft substitute

Michael R Whitehouse, Peter J Dacombe, Jason C J Webb & Ashley W Blom
Hip

Background and purpose Loss of bone stock remains a challenge in revision hip surgery. Grafting with allograft is well established, but there are problems with availability, cost, infection, antigenicity, reproducibility, and stability of the created construct. BoneSave is a biphasic porous ceramic consisting of sintered 80% tricalcium phosphate and 20% hydroxyapatite. In vitro and in vivo studies, including its use mixed with allograft, have shown good results in impaction grafting. This is the first reported series of its use alone in impaction grafting of the acetabulum.

Methods We conducted a retrospective review of a cohort of 43 consecutive patients undergoing impaction grafting of contained acetabular defects by multiple surgeons at a single centre. All patients received uncemented acetabular components. They were followed up radiographically, together with self-reported satisfaction scale (SAPS), Oxford hip score (OHS), and Short-Form 12 (SF12) health survey. Kaplan-Meier survivorship analysis was performed with revision of the acetabular component, revision of any part of the construct, and reoperation as endpoints.

Results The fate of all cases was known. Mean follow-up was 4 years. 5 patients died during follow-up, with their constructs in situ. The survivorship of the acetabular component was 98% (95% CI: 85–100) at 7 years. 1 acetabular component was revised for infection and there was 1 radiographic acetabular failure. The median OHS was 36 (6–48), the median SF12 PCS was 36 (14–57), the median SAPS was 75 (0–100), and the median SF12 MCS was 50 (23–64). The graft material had incorporated in all 3 zones of the acetabulum in 33 out of 37 cases with complete radiographic follow-up.

Interpretation Medium-term results show that BoneSave alone is a reliable material for impaction grafting of contained defects in the acetabulum at revision surgery.


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