Background Although previous studies have shown that prolonged operative times can lead to an increased risk of complications after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), they only evaluated a few complications. It is also unclear whether a distinctive operative time exists after which complications increase. Therefore, this study was performed to (1) assess whether higher operative time increases the risk of complications within 30 days of TKA and (2) explore the relationship between operative time and various complications to identify possible operative times where complication rates increase. Methods The National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database was queried from 2011 to 2015 to identify 140,199 primary TKAs. The effect of operative time (skin-to-skin) on various medical and surgical complications within 30 days was evaluated using multivariable logistic regression models. Spline regression models were created to further study the relationship between operative time and complications. Results After adjusting for confounding factors, longer operative times were associated with higher risks of readmission (P < .001), reoperation (P < .001), surgical site infection (P < .001), wound dehiscence (P < .001), and transfusion (P < .001). The majority of the complications demonstrated an increase throughout the range of operative time, with a slightly pronounced increase in the risk of complications when the operative time was longer than 80 minutes. Conclusion Prolonged operative times were associated with an increased risk of a number of important complications such as readmissions, reoperations, surgical site infections, and wound complications. Based on our results, an operative time goal of less than 80 minutes is helpful for minimizing these complications after TKA.

How Fast Should a Total Knee Arthroplasty Be Performed? An Analysis of 140,199 Surgeries

George, Jaiben et al.
Knee

Background

Although previous studies have shown that prolonged operative times can lead to an increased risk of complications after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), they only evaluated a few complications. It is also unclear whether a distinctive operative time exists after which complications increase. Therefore, this study was performed to (1) assess whether higher operative time increases the risk of complications within 30 days of TKA and (2) explore the relationship between operative time and various complications to identify possible operative times where complication rates increase.

Methods

The National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database was queried from 2011 to 2015 to identify 140,199 primary TKAs. The effect of operative time (skin-to-skin) on various medical and surgical complications within 30 days was evaluated using multivariable logistic regression models. Spline regression models were created to further study the relationship between operative time and complications.

Results

After adjusting for confounding factors, longer operative times were associated with higher risks of readmission (P < .001), reoperation (P < .001), surgical site infection (P < .001), wound dehiscence (P < .001), and transfusion (P < .001). The majority of the complications demonstrated an increase throughout the range of operative time, with a slightly pronounced increase in the risk of complications when the operative time was longer than 80 minutes.

Conclusion

Prolonged operative times were associated with an increased risk of a number of important complications such as readmissions, reoperations, surgical site infections, and wound complications. Based on our results, an operative time goal of less than 80 minutes is helpful for minimizing these complications after TKA.


Download article