Acta Orthop 2009; 80: 263-9.

Cementless total hip arthroplasty in patients with severely dysplastic hips and a previous Schanz osteotomy of the femur: techniques, pitfalls, and long-term outcome.

Eskelinen A, Remes V, Helenius I, Ylinen P, Tallroth K, Paavilainen T.
Hip

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Historically, a Schanz osteotomy of the femur has been used to reduce limp in patients with severely dysplastic hips. In such hips, total hip arthroplasty is a technically demanding operation. We report the long-term results of cementless total hip arthroplasty in a group of patients who had all undergone a Schanz osteotomy earlier.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: From 1988 through 1995, 68 total hip replacements were performed in 59 consecutive patients previously treated with a Schanz osteotomy. With the cup placed at the level of the true acetabulum, a shortening osteotomy of the proximal part of the femur and distal advancement of the greater trochanter were performed in 56 hips. At a mean of 13 (9-18) years postoperatively, we evaluated these patients clinically and radiographically.

RESULTS: The mean Harris hip score had increased from 51 points preoperatively to 93 points. Trendelenburg sign was negative and there was good or slightly reduced abduction strength in 23 of 25 hips that had not been revised. There were 12 perioperative complications. Only 1 cementless press-fit porous-coated cup was revised for aseptic loosening. However, the 12-year survival rate of these cups was only 64%, as 18 cups underwent revision for excessive wear of the polyethylene liner and/or osteolysis. 6 CDH femoral components had to be revised due to technical errors.

INTERPRETATION: Our results suggest that cementless total hip arthroplasty combined with a shortening osteotomy of the femur and distal advancement of the greater trochanter can be recommended for most patients with a previous Schanz osteotomy of the femur. Because of the high incidence of liner wear and osteolysis of modular cementless cups in this series, nowadays we use hard-on-hard articulations in these patients.


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