Tourniquet use in routine primary total knee arthroplasty is associated with a higher transfusion rate and longer postoperative length of stay: a real-world study. BMC Musculoskelet Disord 21, 620 (2020).

Tourniquet use in routine primary total knee arthroplasty is associated with a higher transfusion rate and longer postoperative length of stay: a real-world study

Xu, H., Yang, J., Xie, J. et al.
Knee

Background

In an enhanced recovery after surgery program, a growing number of orthopedists are reconsidering the necessity of tourniquet use in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, the impact of tourniquet use on transfusion rate and postoperative length of stay (PLOS) in TKA remains controversial. Therefore, we carried out a study to investigate the effect of tourniquet application in routine primary TKA on transfusion rate and PLOS.

Methods

We analyzed data from 6325 patients who underwent primary unilateral TKA and divided them into two groups according to whether a tourniquet was applied during the procedure, and a tourniquet was used in 4902 and not used in 1423. The information for transfusion and PLOS was extracted from patients’ electronic health records, and the data were analyzed with logistic and linear regression analyses.

Results

Following TKA, the transfusion rate and PLOS were 14.52% and 7.72 ± 3.54 days, respectively, in the tourniquet group, and 6.47% and 6.44 ± 3.48 days, respectively, in the no-tourniquet group. After adjusting for the different related variables, tourniquet use was significantly correlated with a higher transfusion rate (risk ratio = 1.888, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.449–2.461, P < 0.001) and a longer PLOS (partial regression coefficient (B) = 0.923, 95%CI 0.690–1.156, P < 0.001).

Conclusions

Our findings suggested that tourniquet use in routine primary TKA was related to a higher transfusion rate and a longer PLOS. The impact of tourniquet use on transfusion rate and PLOS should be taken into account in clinical practice.


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