The Journal of Arthroplasty , Volume 33 , Issue 8 , 2546 - 2555

Total Hip Arthroplasty for Periacetabular Metastatic Disease. An Original Technique of Reconstruction According to the Harrington Classification

Wegrzyn, Julien et al.
Hip

Background

Periacetabular metastatic disease requires complex acetabular reconstruction. The complication rate for these frail patients is high. Various cement-rebar reinforced techniques allowing cemented total hip arthroplasty (THA) have been described. The optimal procedure has not yet been identified.

Methods

A continuous series of 131 THAs performed in 126 patients with periacetabular metastatic disease was prospectively included in this study. After bone metastasis curettage and cementation, an original technique of acetabular reconstruction was performed using a dual mobility cup cemented into an acetabular reinforcement device (ie, Kerboull cross-plate or Burch-Schneider antiprotrusio cage) according to the Harrington classification. Functional outcome for independent ambulation in the community, pain relief, and occurrence of dislocation or mechanical failure of the acetabular reconstruction were assessed.

Results

At a mean follow-up of 33 ± 17 months, the improvement in the preoperative to postoperative functional outcome and pain relief was significant (P < .001). The dislocation rate was 2%. Two of the 3 cases of dislocation occurred in acetabular reconstructions associated with a proximal femoral arthroplasty. No mechanical failure or aseptic loosening of the acetabular reconstruction was observed.

Conclusion

This study emphasized that our original technique combining bone metastasis curettage and cementation, acetabular reinforcement device and cemented dual mobility cup was effective to restore a painless functional independence and ensure a durable acetabular reconstruction able to face to adjuvant radiation therapy and mechanical solicitations for long survivors. In addition, dual mobility cup limited the risk of dislocation in patients undergoing THA for periacetabular metastatic disease.


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