The use of an asymmetrical tibial tray in TKA optimises tibial rotation when fitted to the posterior tibial plateau border. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 28, 3821–3826 (2020).

The use of an asymmetrical tibial tray in TKA optimises tibial rotation when fitted to the posterior tibial plateau border

Okazaki, Y., Pujol, N.
Knee

Purpose

The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of positioning an asymmetrical tibial tray relative to the posterior tibial edge and to analyse the relationship between the posterior fit and tibial rotation after computer-assisted total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It was hypothesised that an asymmetrical tray would adjust to the posterior border of the tibial plateau with proper tibial rotation.

Methods

Ninety-three consecutive knees underwent total knee arthroplasty using a Persona fixed-bearing system (63 varus deformities and 30 valgus deformities) and a 3-month follow-up CT scan. An independent examiner measured different variables: the femoral angle between the clinical epicondylar axis and the posterior condylar line of the femoral component, the tibial angle between the posterior borders of the tibial tray and the tibial plateau, and the tibial rotation with respect to the femoral component. These measurements were also compared between varus and valgus subgroups.

Results

For the varus and valgus subgroups, the mean postoperative femoral angle was 2.1º ± 1.2º and 2.5º ± 1.0º, respectively (n.s.). The mean posterior fitting angle of the tibial tray was 0.1º ± 2.4º and 1.4º ± 3.2º for the varus and valgus subgroups, respectively, with a significant difference between groups (p = 0.03). The tibial rotations with respect to the femoral component for the varus and valgus groups were 0.9º ± 3.3º and 2.2º ± 3.1º of external rotation, respectively (n.s.).

Conclusions

This study demonstrated that fitting an asymmetrical tibial tray to the posterior border of the tibial plateau could optimise tibial rotation. The posterior border was considered to be a reliable and easily identifiable landmark for proper tibial rotation and coverage during a primary TKA.

Level of evidence

IV


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