Short Femoral Stem in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Stable Fixation and Low Complication Rates in Elderly Patients. HIP International, 27(4), 311–316.

Short Femoral Stem in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Stable Fixation and Low Complication Rates in Elderly Patients

Morales de Cano, J. J., Gordo, C., & Canosa Areste, J. (2017).
Hip

We present the result of our experience in using a short femoral stem in elderly patients (>70 years of age) compared to patients younger than 70 years.

Data were prospectively collected on 138 patients who underwent 148 primary total hip arthroplasty (THA), with a conservative short stem between November 2010 and June 2014. The cohort was divided into 2 groups: the study group (group 1) comprised 57 patients (60 THA) over 70 years of age at the time of surgery, with a mean age of 75.4 years (range 70-87 years) and a mean follow-up of 26.7 months (range 9-48 months). The control group (group 2) comprised 81patients (88 THA) less than 70 years of age with a mean age of 57.4 years (range 33-69 years) and a mean follow-up of 27.3 months (range 9-54 months).

 

Hip function in the 2 groups was compared preoperatively and postoperatively using the Merle D’Aubigne hip score (MD) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) score.

At the latest follow-up, 1 calcar fracture was reported in a 54-year-old patient in the control group, which required fixation with a screw and had a favourable outcome. No cases of clinical or radiographic loosening were reported.

 

Clinical results showed no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups.

The use of the GTS conservative short stem in patients over 70 years old has shown very good results and low complication rates, comparable to those for patients younger than 70 years.


Download article