Relations between the Crowe classification and the 3D femoral head displacement in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip. BMC Musculoskelet Disord 20, 530 (2019).

Relations between the Crowe classification and the 3D femoral head displacement in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip

Cheng, R., Zhang, H., Kernkamp, W.A. et al.
Hip

Background

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the three dimensional (3D) femoral head displacement in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) and Crowe classification.

Methods

Retrospectively, CT scans of 60 DDH patients and 55 healthy demography-matched healthy control subjects were analyzed. Using the anterior pelvic plane a pelvic anatomic coordinate system was established. The center coordinates of the femoral heads of both the DDH patients and control subjects were quantified relative to the pelvic coordinate system and were mapped proportionally to a representative normal pelvis for comparison.

Results

In the anteroposterior (AP) direction, the center of the femoral head was significantly more anterior in the DDH patients (type I, II, and III, respectively45.0 ± 5.5, 42.9 ± 7.1, and 43.9 ± 4.6 mm) when compared to the controls (50.0 ± 5.2 mm) (p < 0.001 for all). In the medial-lateral (ML) direction, the center of the femoral head was significantly more lateral in the DDH patients (type I, II, and III =103.5 ± 8.6, 101.5 ± 6.6, 102.1 ± 11.2 mm) when compared to the controls (87.5 ± 5.1 mm) (p < 0.001 for all). In the superior-inferior (SI) direction, the center of the femoral head was significantly more proximal in the DDH patients (type I, II, and III =62.4 ± 7.3, 50.0 ± 6.3, and 43.2 ± 6.6 mm) when compared to the controls (66.0 ± 6.2 mm) (p < 0.001 for all).

Conclusions

The severity of DDH using the Crowe classification was related to the degree of the femoral head displacement in the SI direction, but not in the ML or AP directions. By assessing the 3D femoral head displacement in DDH patients, individualized component positioning might benefit surgical outcome.


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