The Journal of Arthroplasty, Volume 35, Issue 4, 1048 - 1053

Preoperative Depression Is Associated With Increased Risk Following Revision Total Joint Arthroplasty

Wilson, Jacob M. et al.
Hip Knee

Background

The incidence of revision total hip (rTHA) and knee (rTKA) arthroplasty continues to increase. Preoperative depression is known to influence outcomes following primary arthroplasty. Despite this, it remains unknown whether the same relationship exists for patients undergoing revision procedures. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to investigate this relationship.

Methods

This is a retrospective cohort study. Patients undergoing rTHA and rTKA were identified from the Truven MarketScan database. Patients with a diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection were excluded. Two cohorts were created: those with preoperative depression and those without. We included patients who were enrolled in the database for 1 year preoperatively and postoperatively. Demographic and complication data were collected, and statistical analysis was then performed comparing complications between cohorts.

Results

A total of 10,017 patients undergoing rTHA and 13,973 patients undergoing rTKA were included in this study. Of these, 1305 (13.1%) and 2012 (14.4%) had depression, respectively. Multivariate analysis found that, after rTHA, preoperative depression was associated with extended length of stay, nonhome discharge, 90-day readmission, 90-day emergency department visit, prosthetic joint infection, revision surgery, and increased costs (P < .001). Similarly, following rTKA, depression was associated with extended length of stay, nonhome discharge, 90-day readmission, 90-day emergency department visit, revision surgery, and increased costs (P < .001).

Conclusion

Depression before revision total joint arthroplasty is common and is associated with increased risk of complication and increased healthcare resource utilization following both rTHA and rTKA. Further research will be needed to delineate to what degree this represents a modifiable risk factor.

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