The Journal of Arthroplasty, Volume 35, Issue 4, 1095 - 1100

On-Table and Short-Term Mortality: A Single-Institution Experience With Cementing All Hip Arthroplasties for Neck of Femur Fractures

Tan, Kelvin G. et al.
Hip

Background

To review on-table, day 0, day 1, day 7, and day 30 mortality after hemiarthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty (THA) using cemented femoral stems for femoral neck fractures in order to evaluate risk factors for perioperative and short-term mortality.

Methods

The medical records of 751 consecutive cases with neck of femur fractures who underwent hemiarthroplasty (n = 602) or THA (n = 149) with cemented stems between January 2011 and December 2016 were retrospectively reviewed from a prospectively gathered database. The primary outcome measures were on-table, day 0, day 1, day 7, and day 30 mortality. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed in order to identify various contributing patient and surgical variables.

Results

There were 2 on-table deaths (0.27%): one patient had a cardiorespiratory arrest at the time of inserting the femoral stem and the other had a cardiorespiratory arrest at the end of wound closure some 20 minutes after cementing. There were 3 further day 0 deaths meaning the day 0 mortality rate was 0.67% (5/751). All 5 patients were older than 80 years and had an American Society of Anesthesiologists grade 3 or more. The 1-day, 7-day, and 30-day mortality rates were 0.93% (7 patients), 2.7% (20 patients), and 6.8% (51 patients), respectively. There is significantly higher 30-day mortality risk associated with increasing American Society of Anesthesiologists grade ( P < .001) when adjusted for age, gender, and type of surgery (hemiarthroplasty compared with THA).

Conclusion

In our neck of femur fracture patients who were operated with cemented stems, 7-day and 30-day mortality rates were 2.7% and 6.8%, respectively. Cemented stems should be used with caution in elderly hip fracture patients with multiple comorbidities who are at high risk of perioperative mortality.

Download article