The Journal of Arthroplasty, Volume 34, Issue 7, S292 - S296

Nonmodular Stems Are a Viable Alternative to Modular Stems in Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty

Clair, Andrew J. et al.
Hip

Background

Nonmodular and modular femoral stems have been associated with complications after revision total hip arthroplasty (rTHA). As such, the ideal femoral component for rTHA remains undecided. This study aims to report outcomes of titanium, tapered-fluted, modular and nonmodular femoral components in rTHA.

Methods

From January 1, 2013 to September 30, 2017, all rTHAs using modular or nonmodular femoral stems were identified. Demographic data including age, gender, and American Society of Anesthesiologists scores were collected. Surgical details including operative time and implant cost were also collected. Clinical outcomes including length of stay, dislocation, infection, fracture, reoperation, and re-revision were collected. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square test and Student’s t-test for all categorical and continuous variables, respectively.

Results

One hundred forty-six rTHA cases (103 modular and 43 nonmodular) were identified with an average follow-up of 29 months (range 3-59 months). Nonmodular stems had a significantly lower cost when compared to modular implants (modular stems 120.8% higher cost; P < .001). The surgical time of nonmodular components was significantly greater (193 minutes vs 163 minutes; P = .029). There were no differences observed in any other surgical details or clinical outcomes assessed, including length of stay ( P = .323), rate of re-revision of the femoral implant ( P = .389), rate of re-operation ( P = .383), and postop complications ( P = .241), including infection ( P = .095), dislocation ( P = .778), and fracture ( P = .959).

Conclusions

Nonmodular components provide encouraging clinical results with significantly lower costs compared to modular implants in rTHA. The use of titanium, tapered-fluted, nonmodular components may offer a more cost-effective approach to rTHA compared to their modular counterparts.

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