No clinical differences at the 2-year follow-up between single radius and J-curve medial pivot total knee arthroplasty in the treatment of neutral or varus knees. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 28, 3949–3954 (2020).

No clinical differences at the 2-year follow-up between single radius and J-curve medial pivot total knee arthroplasty in the treatment of neutral or varus knees

Indelli, P.F., Morello, F., Ghirardelli, S. et al.
Knee

Purpose

Modern total knee arthroplasty (TKA) systems are designed to reproduce the normal knee kinematics and improve patient outcome. The authors compared two different third-generation medial pivot TKA implants, having a single-radius or a J-curve design in their sagittal plane, hypothesizing no clinical differences.

Methods

Two cohorts of 50 patients who underwent primary TKA were first preoperatively matched by sex, deformity, body mass index (BMI), Oxford Knee Score (OKS), Knee society score (KSS) and range of motion (ROM) and then statistically analyzed at a minimum follow-up (FU) of 2 years. An identical surgical technique, which aimed to reproduce a slightly tighter medial than lateral compartment, was used in all knees.

Results

At a minimum follow-up of 2 years (range 24–34 months) there were no statistically significant differences in OKS and KSS between the two implant groups. The final ROM differed statistically between the two groups: the average maximum active flexion was 123° in the J-curve femoral design group with an adapted “medially-congruent” polyethylene insert, and 116° in the single radius femoral design with a medial “ball-in-socket” articulation.

Conclusion

No clinical and radiological differences were found when the two cohorts of patients were compared. This study showed that the implant design played a minor role in the final outcome as opposed to a precise surgical technique.

Level of evidence

Retrospective case-control study, Level III.


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