Lower limb kinematics improvement after genicular nerve blockade in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a milestone study using inertial sensors. BMC Musculoskelet Disord 21, 822 (2020).

Lower limb kinematics improvement after genicular nerve blockade in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a milestone study using inertial sensors

Lebleu, J., Fonkoue, L., Bandolo, E. et al.
Knee

Background

Genicular nerve blockade is a possible treatment for patients with knee osteoarthritis. Pain relief and improvement in functioning is expected. This procedure could be of major interest for patients in low-income countries where total knee arthroplasty is not available for the population. This study aims at assessing the immediate benefits on pain, gait, and stairs kinematics after a genicular nerve blockade in patients suffering from knee osteoarthritis in Cameroun.

Methods

A prospective study was carried out on 26 subjects in Cameroun. A genicular nerve blockade was performed on 14 women with painful knee osteoarthritis grade 2–4. Lower limb joint angles were recorded with inertial sensors before and 1 h after injection. Patient-reported outcomes of pain and perceived difficulty were collected, as well as 10 m and 6 min walking tests. A reliability analysis of inertial sensors was performed on a sample of 12 healthy subjects by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient and the standard error of measurement.

Results

Pain and perceived difficulty decreased significantly (p < 0.001). Cadence increased significantly in stairs climbing (upstairs: + 7.7 steps/min; downstairs: + 7.6 steps/min). There was an improvement for hip sagittal range of motion during gait (+ 9.3°) and pelvis transverse range of motion in walking upstairs (− 3.3°). Angular speed range of the knee in the sagittal plane and of the hip in the frontal plane increased significantly in stairs descent (+ 53.7°/s, + 94.5°/s).

Conclusions

This study quantified improvement of gait and stair climbing immediately after a genicular nerve blockade in patients suffering from knee OA in Cameroon. This is the first study objectifying this effect, through wearable sensors.


Download article