Load imbalances existed as determined by a sensor after conventional gap balancing with a tensiometer in total knee arthroplasty. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 28, 2953–2961 (2020).

Load imbalances existed as determined by a sensor after conventional gap balancing with a tensiometer in total knee arthroplasty

Song, S.J., Lee, H.W., Kim, K.I. et al.
Knee

Purpose

To evaluate intercompartmental load intraoperatively with a sensor after conventional gap balancing with a tensiometer during total knee arthroplasty (TKA).

Methods

Fifty sensor-assisted TKA procedures were performed prospectively between August and September 2018 with a cruciate-retaining prosthesis. After applying a modified measured resection technique, conventional balancing between resected surfaces was achieved. The equal and rectangular flexion–extension gaps were confirmed using a tensiometer at 90° and 5°–7° (due to posterior tibial slope) of knee flexion. Then, the load distribution was evaluated intraoperatively with a sensor placed on trial implants in the positions of knee flexion (90° flexion) and extension (10° flexion).

Results

The proportion of coronal load imbalance (medial load − lateral load ≥  ± 15 lb) was 56% in extension and 32% in flexion (p = 0.023). The proportion of sagittal load imbalance (extension load − flexion load ≥  ± 15 lb) was 36% in the medial compartment and 4% in the lateral compartment (p < 0.001). An additional procedure for load balancing was performed in 74% of knees.

Conclusions

Coronal and sagittal load imbalances existed as determined by the sensor even after the achievement of appropriate conventional gap balance. The additional rebalancing procedure was performed for balanced loads in 74% of the knees after conventional balancing. The use of an intraoperative load sensor offers the advantage of direct evaluation of the load on TKA implants.

Level of evidence

IV.


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