Influence of Glenosphere and baseplate parameters on Glenoid bone strains in reverse shoulder Arthroplasty. BMC Musculoskelet Disord 20, 587 (2019).

Influence of Glenosphere and baseplate parameters on Glenoid bone strains in reverse shoulder Arthroplasty

Pauzenberger, L., Dwyer, C., Obopilwe, E. et al.
Shoulder

Background

Little is known about the strains at the glenoid near the bone-implant interface in reverse shoulder arthroplasty. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the strains on the glenoid bone under a compressive load after implantation of three different sizes of metal-backed baseplates in either inferior or superior position in combination with three different sizes of glenospheres and three different glenosphere designs.

Methods

Three sizes of baseplates (small, medium, large) were implanted in thirty-six paired human cadaveric scapulae either inferior, flush with the glenoid neck, or with a 5 mm superior offset. Glenospheres were available in three sizes (36 mm, 39 mm, 42 mm) and designs (standard, 4 mm lateralized, 2.5 mm inferiorized). Specimens were mounted in a servo-hydraulic testing apparatus at a 60° angle between the glenoid and actuator holding the humeral component. Four strain-gauge rosettes were placed around the glenoid rim to measure strains transferred to the scapular bone under a compressive load (750 N) relative to the various baseplate-glenosphere combinations. Following repeated compression, a load-to-failure test was performed.

Results

Mean overall registered strains were 161με (range: − 1165 to 2347) at the inferior sensor, −2με (range: − 213 to 90) at the superior sensor, −95με (range: − 381 to 254) at the anterior sensor, and 13με (range: − 298 to 128) at the posterior sensor. Measured bone strains did not show any significant differences across tested baseplate and glenosphere design, size, or positioning combinations (p > 0.05 for all sensors). Furthermore, linear regression analysis did not identify any of the evaluated parameters as an independent influential factor for strains (p > 0.05 for all sensors). Mean load-at-failure was significantly higher in the group of inferior (3347.0 N ± 704.4 N) compared to superior (2763.8 N ± 927.8 N) positioned baseplates (p = 0.046).

Conclusion

Different baseplate positions, baseplate sizes, glenosphere sizes, and glenosphere design or various combinations of these parameters did not significantly influence the measured bone strains at the glenoid near the bone-implant interface in a contemporary reverse shoulder arthroplasty system.

Level of evidence

Basic Science Study, Biomechanical Study.


Download article