Indwelling urinary catheterization was unnecessary in non-drainage total knee arthroplasty: a randomized controlled trial. Arch Orthop Trauma Surg 141, 469–476 (2021).

Indwelling urinary catheterization was unnecessary in non-drainage total knee arthroplasty: a randomized controlled trial

Thiengwittayaporn, S., Uthaitas, P., Hongku, N. et al.
Knee

Purpose

To investigate whether catheterization remains necessary in non-drainage total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSEA) with a short-acting opioid by comparing (1) incidences of postoperative urinary retention (POUR), and (2) postoperative clinical outcomes between retained urinary catheter (UC) and non-retained urinary catheter (non-UC) groups.

Methods

A total of 230 patients underwent non-drainage TKA using CSEA with fentanyl were randomized into UC and non-UC groups (115 patients each, 115 knees each). Incidences of POUR, clinical outcomes (intraoperative intravenous fluid, operative time, whole blood loss, urinary tract infection (UTI), and length of stay) were evaluated after the operation, while range of motion (ROM) and Knee society score (KSS) were evaluated 3- and 6-month postoperatively.

Results

Incidences of POUR and other perioperative and postoperative clinical outcomes between the two groups were not significantly different. ROM and KSS at 3- and 6-month postoperatively revealed no significant differences between the groups.

Conclusion

Given no significant difference in POUR incidence, clinical outcomes and knee scores and functions, catheterization in non-drainage TKA under CSEA with a short-acting opioid might not be necessary.


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