The Knee, ISSN: 0968-0160, Vol: 14, Issue: 3, Page: 194-197

Fixation strength comparison of onlay and inset patellar implants

Alexander D. Rosenstein; Paul D. Postak; A. Seth Greenwald
Knee

Patellar implant fixation continues to be one of the most troublesome areas in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It has been reported that patellofemoral complications in TKA are responsible for almost half of all re-operations. The literature review revealed the rate of primary all-polyethylene patellar implant loosening ranging 1%–4.2% [Berend ME, Ritter MA, Keating EM, Faris PM, Crites BM. The failure of all-polyethylene patellar components in total knee replacement. Clin Orthop 2001;388:105–11, Chew JT, Stewart NJ, Hanssen AD, Luo ZP, Rand JA, An KN. Differences in patellar tracking and knee kinematics among three different total knee designs. Clin Orthop 1997;345:87–98, Barrack RL, Wolfe MW, Waldman DA, et al. Patellar resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty: a five to seven year follow-up of prospective, randomized, double-blind study. Proceedings of Sixty-Seventh Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons 2000. p. 547]. The loosening rates for metal-backed or following patellar component revisions were considerably higher [Chew JT, Stewart NJ, Hanssen AD, Luo ZP, Rand JA, An KN. Differences in patellar tracking and knee kinematics among three different total knee designs. Clin Orthop 1997;345:87–98, Jordan LR, Sorrells RB, Jordan LC, Olivo JL. The long-term results of a metal-backed mobile bearing patella. Clin Orthop 2005;436:111–8, Berger RA, Lyon, JH, Jacobs JJ, Barden RM, Berkson EM, Sheinkop MB, et al. Problems with cementless total knee arthroplasty at 11 years followup. Clin Orthop 2001;392:196–207, Ritter MA, Pierce MJ, Zhou H, Meding JB, Faris PM, Keating EM. Patellar complications (total knee arthroplasty). Effect of lateral release and thickness. Clin Orthop 1999;367:149–57] Onlay and inset patellar components with variable fixation surface geometry are currently available for clinical use. The purpose of this study was to quantify the shear disassociation strength for both onlay and inset patellar fixation techniques. The variation in host material was minimized by the use of synthetic patellae, which has been previously validated in implant fixation studies. The testing revealed that inset patellar fixation resistance to shear disassociation was 25% higher than onlay patellae ( p = 0.0002).


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