The Journal of Arthroplasty, Volume 35, Issue 5, 1315 - 1322

Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate as a Risk Stratification Tool for Early Complications in Revision Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty

Krebs, Olivia K. et al.
Hip Knee

Background

Establishing an association between postoperative outcomes and the spectrum of renal function would allow for more informed decisions to manage surgical risks and improved patient-specific care. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) can be calculated from standard prescreening measurements to gauge renal function. This work investigates the effect of eGFR, as a continuous and categorical variable, on mortality and major and minor complications in patients undergoing revision total knee and hip arthroplasty.

Methods

25,056 patients having undergone revision total hip and knee arthroplasty from 2013 to 2016 were identified using the National Quality Improvement Program database. The investigated outcomes included 30-day mortality, major complications, and minor complications. Multivariate regression models were created to evaluate the effect of eGFR on the outcomes of interest. Multivariate spline regressions were generated to assess for nonlinear relationships between eGFR as a continuous variable and the outcomes.

Results

Our study revealed that as eGFR decreased <60 mL/min/1.73 m 2, mortality ( P = .0001), any major complication ( P < .001), and any minor complication ( P < .001) increased. Patients with eGFR 15-30 mL/min/1.73 m 2 had increased risk for mortality ( P = .033). There was an increased risk for any major complication at an eGFR 30-60 and <15 mL/min/1.73 m 2, ( P < .05). There was an increased risk of minor complications for those with hyperfiltration and <60 mL/min/1.73 m 2.

Conclusion

Patients with lower preoperative eGFR generally display an increased risk for complications after revision total hip and knee arthroplasty. Proper consideration should be given to this patient population before surgical intervention to allow for preventative measures to be taken to improve patient outcomes.

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