Effect of dislocation timing following primary total hip arthroplasty on the risk of redislocation and revision. HIP International, 29(5), 489–495.

Effect of dislocation timing following primary total hip arthroplasty on the risk of redislocation and revision

Norambuena, G. A., Wyles, C. C., Van Demark, R. E., & Trousdale, R. T. (2019).
Hip

There is little data regarding timing of index dislocation in patients who undergo primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) and subsequent risk of redislocation and revision.

Between 1992 and 2013, 21,490 primary THAs were performed at a single institution. 189 patients (190 hips) had a first episode of dislocation within one year of index surgery (0.9 %). 32 patients (32 hips) were excluded for the following reasons: complex THA secondary to fracture malunion, Crowe III/IV developmental hip dysplasia, periprosthetic fracture, prior hip surgery, incomplete information, and hip abductor avulsion. The final cohort consisted of 157 patients (158 hips) who experienced dislocation within 1 year of primary non-complex THA. 88 patients were female (56%), mean age was 61 years (SD = 14), and mean follow-up was 76 months (range 0–229). Multivariable Cox proportional-hazards regression models with fractional polynomial models were used to estimate the association between timing of index dislocation and subsequent redislocation and revision surgery.

69 patients (44%) redislocated at final follow-up. Revision for any cause occurred in 26 out of 157 hips (17%). Time lapse from index THA to first dislocation was significantly associated with the risk of redislocation (p = 0.004) and with the risk of revision (p = 0.04). For every additional 7 days from surgery, risk of redislocation increased by a factor of 1.1 and risk of revision was increased by a factor of 1.13.

This study demonstrates there is a lower risk of redislocation and revision in patients who have a first episode of dislocation closer to primary THA.


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