Clinical study of outcomes after revision surgery using porous titanium custom-made implants for severe acetabular septic bone defects. International Orthopaedics (SICOT) 44, 1957–1964 (2020).

Clinical study of outcomes after revision surgery using porous titanium custom-made implants for severe acetabular septic bone defects

Burastero, G., Cavagnaro, L., Chiarlone, F. et al.
Hip

Purpose

Acetabular bone loss is a challenging problem in revision total hip arthroplasty (rTHA). Severe bone loss is not uncommon especially in periprosthetic joint infection. Surgical options, including revision shells, rings, and cages—with or without bone allograft—are affected by high complication rates and unsatisfactory clinical results. We report our mid-term results of non-flanged, custom-made acetabular components in staged rTHA.

Methods

We retrospectively reviewed all patients undergoing two-stage revision with acetabular custom-made implants between 2014 and 2016 at a single institution. Harris Hip Scores, Oxford Hip Scores, and Visual Analogue Scales for pain were obtained, and radiographical follow-up was performed. Complications were reported and analysed.

Results

We included 19 patients (19 hips) with an average follow-up of 42.3 ± 11.8 months. At the time of re-implantation, significant acetabular bone loss according to Paprosky classification (IIC, IIIA-B, and pelvic discontinuity) was detected in our patients. Clinical outcomes showed statistically significant improvement from pre-operative visit to last follow-up (p < 0.01). All custom-made implants had radiological osseointegration, and we did not find any implant complications, such as loosening or malposition. No mismatch between pre-operative planning and intra-operative findings was observed. To date, we report one septic failure managed with second staged revision, and one re-operation for recurrent THA dislocation.

Conclusions

Custom-made acetabular implants showed excellent clinical and radiographic mid-term outcomes with a low rate of related complications, providing implant stability on residual host bone, restoring hip biomechanics, and allowing biological osseointegration. Further long-term studies are needed to confirm preliminary results.


Download article