Cementless total hip arthroplasty in young patients under the age of 30: a minimum 10-year follow-up. HIP International, 28(5), 507–513.

Cementless total hip arthroplasty in young patients under the age of 30: a minimum 10-year follow-up

Shin, E. H., & Moon, K. H. (2018).
Hip

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiologic outcomes of young patients (under the age of 30) who received a total hip arthroplasty (THA) and in whom patients had been followed for more than 10 years.

This retrospective study was conducted for 51 hips (44 patients) that had undergone THA. The mean age for the index operation was 25.71 years, and the mean follow-up period was 13.7 years. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by Harris hip score (HHS), activity level, and complications. Radiographic evaluations were assessed according to osteolysis, loosening, and polyethylene wear.

The average HHS improved from 67.47 pre-operatively to 97.42 at the final follow-up (p < 0.001). The activity level changed from 1.92 pre-operatively to 1.33 at the final follow-up (p < 0.001). Ten cases had undergone revision arthroplasty within the follow-up period, and the overall survival rate was 80.4% at the final follow-up with revision for any reason as the end point. Polyethylene liners were used in all revision cases (p = 0.003). Patients with modular stem had a higher failure rate than patients with a fully porous coated stem (p < 0.001). Furthermore, a small diameter head size was associated with a higher risk of revision surgery (p = 0.003). Complications such as dislocations were found in three hips.

Cementless THA yields encouraging clinical and radiological results in young and active patients under the age of 30. However, the bearing surface, type of stem, and head size influenced component durability and revision rate.


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